Book Review: 50 Shades HOT DAMN – Final review on the trilogy

Say what you will, but SEX SELLS and man, does it make for a good read!

Last week I finished (in less than 72 hours, thank you very much!) both of the remaining two books  (Fifty Shades: Darker and Fifty Shades: Freed) in the Fifty Shades trilogy by E.L. James. And, unlike the first book, I could actually read these other two outside of my house without turning crimson and needing to find my husband (tehetehe).

As with most sequential trilogies, these books continue to follow the incredible lives of Anastacia Steel and Christian Grey – chronicalling their “kinky fuckery” and mounting (tehe) love for one another.  While less explicit, their sexual interactions – or relations, if you were to ask Bill Clinton – are nonetheless inventive, and like in the first novel, surrounded by a decent story line and effective, thoughful dialogue.

HOWEVER, and this is a big however, the stories got a little predictable. And, what’s more, I started to question James. I don’t know if she’s ever actually visited the US….I am all for people writing novels set in different countries, but if you can do your research into the kinkiest of all “kinky fuckery”, can’t you do some homework on how American’s talk? Throughout both of these later books, James drops in the not-so-subtle “Englishisms” as opposed to American English. I found that beyond frustrating and it made the story – which takes place in Seattle (SEATTLE????REALLY???WHY SEATTLE????) – just hard to reconcile. Why not set the scene in London?

Beyond that, I think I would have like the grittiness to continue elevate. Part of what made the first book so appealing was the novelty of the BDSM relationship. Once that wore off, if it weren’t for the actual story line – which was good – the book lost some of its lustre.

Overall, though, I’d say its worth the $30 for the three books – you won’t be disappointed.

Rachael’s Grades:

Writing: A

Character Development: B+

Plot: B

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